Arthritis

Arthritis

In the U.S., arthritis is the No. 1 cause of disability, affecting patients of every age and physical condition.

One in 5 adults — almost 53 million Americans — lives with this debilitating condition, and the Arthritis Foundationpredicts that number will expand to more than 78 million by 2040.

In addition to the pain and disability this condition causes, it affects millions of people’s ability to work. In fact, patients with rheumatoid and osteoarthritis miss a combined total of 172 million workdays each year in the U.S.

Treating this condition successfully is imperative, if patients hope to regain their mobility and their active,     healthy lifestyles.

 What Is Arthritis?

Arthritis is a blanket term used to describe more than 100 different types of joint disease. Despite how common this condition is, it is not well understood by most people.

Osteoarthritis (OA) occurs when joint cartilage degenerates, or wears away, allowing bones to rub together. This results in chronic pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling, and eventually leads to permanent joint damage.

With rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the synovium — the thin membranes that surround joints — causes damage to the joints. Whereas OA is localized to individual joints, RA is systemic, meaning it affects the entire body, sometimes including vital organs.

Causes & Treatment of Arthritis

This painful condition has many causes, risk factors and comorbidities.

OA is known to be hereditary, but age, excess weight and previous injury all increase your chances of developing this condition. It may also develop as a result of repetitive use or strain.

RA is an immune-related condition that develops when the body mistakenly attacks itself, causing uncontrolled inflammation.

Treatment has traditionally been limited to medication (to control pain and reduce inflammation) and joint surgery. Diet can help reduce inflammation, and select natural arthritis remedies may benefit some patients.

However, most patients are forced to live with the pain and disability this condition causes.

Laser Therapy for Arthritis

Laser therapy for OA and RA provides a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment alternative that arthritis patients desperately need.

Studies demonstrate the effectiveness of laser therapy for reducing arthritis pain and improving patient mobility for OA patients. In addition, the research proves that laser light therapy is beneficial for reducing inflammation and improving cartilage conditions in OA patients. For RA patients, laser therapy has been shown effective in the research for reducing joint inflammation in both the early and advanced stages of the disease.

Laser therapy is effective, evidence-based treatment for patients experiencing arthritis in the knees, shoulders, elbows, hands, wrists, ankles, feet, neck and spine.

Wexford Laser Therapy, located in Draper, Wexford Laser, is proud to provide this safe and effective treatment alternative for our patients. Dr. Muir is one of only a few MDs in the United States trained and certified in performing laser therapy using our specialized equipment and technology. Contact our office today to schedule your consultation to learn more about laser therapy for arthritis.